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halcyonharlot:

pastapunk:

So I just found out that to be an astronaut you can’t be under 5’2” and this is BULLSHIT I never wanted to be an astronaut until I found out I couldn’t and now I feel like a dream has been crushed fuck you NASA

i don’t want to live in a world where we can’t launch danny devito into space

http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/postsecondary/features/F_Astronaut_Requirements.html

"My best day had to be the day after I wrapped Guardians of the Galaxy. I was very homesick and coming home to my wife, and my home, and to my son, who was at the time 13 months old. My wife told me there’s a chance he won’t recognize you—but that’s okay that happens all the time. He doesn’t know, he might be a little shy…"

(Source: pedro-quill)

We were grabbing a bite of lunch at a small cafe, in a mall, right across from a booth that sold jewelry and where ears could be pierced for a fee. A mother approaches with a little girl of six or seven years old. The little girl is clearly stating that she doesn’t want her ears pierced, that’s she’s afraid of how much it will hurt, that she doesn’t like earrings much in the first place. Her protests, her clear ‘no’ is simply not heard. The mother and two other women, who work the booth, begin chatting and trying to engage the little girl in picking out a pair of earrings. She has to wear a particular kind when the piercing is first done but she could pick out a fun pair for later.

"I don’t want my ears pierced."

"I don’t want any earrings."

The three adults glance at each other conspiratorially and now the pressure really begins. She will look so nice, all the other girls she knows wear earrings, the pain isn’t bad.

She, the child, sees what’s coming and starts crying. As the adults up the volume so does she, she’s crying and emitting a low wail at the same time. “I DON’T WANT MY EARS PIERCED.”

Her mother leans down and speaks to her, quietly but strongly, the only words we could hear were ‘… embarrassing me.’

We heard, then, two small screams, when the ears were pierced.

Little children learn early and often that ‘no doesn’t mean no.’

Little children learn early that no one will stand with them, even the two old men looking horrified at the events from the cafeteria.

Little girls learn early and often that their will is not their own.

No means no, yeah, right.

Most often, for kids and others without power, ”no means force.”

from "No Means Force" at Dave Hingsburger’s blog.

This is important. It doesn’t just apply to little girls and other children, though it often begins there.

For the marginalized, our “no’s” are discounted as frivolous protests, rebelliousness, or anger issues, or we don’t know what we’re talking about, or we don’t understand what’s happening.

When “no means force” we become afraid to say no.

(via k-pagination)

txchnologist:

Physicists Manipulate Waves To Make Tractor Beam

Scientists studying how floating particles move on the surface of water have come up with a way to pull them in, push them away or make them stay still. They can now precisely control objects by generating waves with specified frequency and amplitude.

The work by Australian National University researchers might find use in cleaning up oil spills. It could also lead to a better understanding of how moving water develops into rip currents.

"We have figured out a way of creating waves that can force a floating object to move against the direction of the wave," said physicist Horst Punzmann, who led the research. "No one could have guessed this result."

Read More

scienceyoucanlove:

Mola Mola: The Weirdest Fish in the Ocean?
By Craig Leisher
When it hatches, a Mola mola is the size of a pinhead but will grow to be the heaviest bony fish in the ocean—and the weirdest.
The weirdness begins with the eggs. A female Mola mola or ocean sunfish produces more eggs than any other vertebrate on earth.
One modest-sized female had an estimate 300 million eggs inside her.
At birth, the baby fish are protected by a star-shaped transparent covering that looks like someone put an alien head inside of a Christmas ornament—albeit a very small only a tenth of an inch across.
Even as a baby, the Mola mola has its parents’ surprised look with the wide eye and open mouth.
The baby will grow fast. Very fast. One individual in the Monterey Bay Aquarium gained 822 pounds in just 15 months (almost 2 pounds a day).
By the time it is an adolescent, the fish will have not tail fin, no ribs, a fused spine, and will swim by flapping its dorsal fin on the top and its anal fin on the bottom.
It will look like a giant swimming head.
Mola molas spend much of their lives in the open ocean chasing the sea jellie (a.k.a. jellyfish) they often eat. They have unusual teeth that are fused together inside a mouth they never close.
They are called the ocean sunfish because they are frequently seen catching rays on the ocean surface. One reason they float on the surface is so birds can peck out the parasites off their skin.
And they have a lot of parasites. More than 50 species of parasites have been recorded on and inside Mola molas.
Like sharks and rays, the female are far bigger than the males. The heaviest Mola mola on record is a female caught in 1996 that weighed 5,071 pounds (2,300 kg).
Here a picture from 1910 of a Mola mola that weighed an estimate 3,500 pounds. (1,600 kg).
The huge decline in shark populations and far greater numbers of sea jellies in the ocean mean Mola molas now have fewer predators and more food. The 21th century looks like a good one if you’re a Mola mola.
But who knows for how long. Given that they are one of the few large fish in the ocean that are doing well, don’t be surprised if someone gives the Mola Mola a catchy new name and starts selling them globally, just as marketers did for the Slimehead (Orange Roughy) and the Patagonia toothfish (Chilean sea bass).
You can see a Mola molas at a Nature Conservancy-supported marine protected area near Bali, Indonesia. The Mola mola congregate near Nusa Penida Island, and during the peak of mola season in October, there is a great chance of seeing the weirdness (and the parasites) of the Mola mola firsthand.
- See more at: http://blog.nature.org/science/2014/04/02/mola-mola-the-weirdest-fish-in-the-ocean/#sthash.J4zj7wCj.dpuf
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scienceyoucanlove:

Mola Mola: The Weirdest Fish in the Ocean?

By Craig Leisher

When it hatches, a Mola mola is the size of a pinhead but will grow to be the heaviest bony fish in the ocean—and the weirdest.

The weirdness begins with the eggs. A female Mola mola or ocean sunfish produces more eggs than any other vertebrate on earth.

One modest-sized female had an estimate 300 million eggs inside her.

At birth, the baby fish are protected by a star-shaped transparent covering that looks like someone put an alien head inside of a Christmas ornament—albeit a very small only a tenth of an inch across.

Even as a baby, the Mola mola has its parents’ surprised look with the wide eye and open mouth.

The baby will grow fast. Very fast. One individual in the Monterey Bay Aquarium gained 822 pounds in just 15 months (almost 2 pounds a day).

By the time it is an adolescent, the fish will have not tail fin, no ribs, a fused spine, and will swim by flapping its dorsal fin on the top and its anal fin on the bottom.

It will look like a giant swimming head.

Mola molas spend much of their lives in the open ocean chasing the sea jellie (a.k.a. jellyfish) they often eat. They have unusual teeth that are fused together inside a mouth they never close.

They are called the ocean sunfish because they are frequently seen catching rays on the ocean surface. One reason they float on the surface is so birds can peck out the parasites off their skin.

And they have a lot of parasites. More than 50 species of parasites have been recorded on and inside Mola molas.

Like sharks and rays, the female are far bigger than the males. The heaviest Mola mola on record is a female caught in 1996 that weighed 5,071 pounds (2,300 kg).

Here a picture from 1910 of a Mola mola that weighed an estimate 3,500 pounds. (1,600 kg).

The huge decline in shark populations and far greater numbers of sea jellies in the ocean mean Mola molas now have fewer predators and more food. The 21th century looks like a good one if you’re a Mola mola.

But who knows for how long. Given that they are one of the few large fish in the ocean that are doing well, don’t be surprised if someone gives the Mola Mola a catchy new name and starts selling them globally, just as marketers did for the Slimehead (Orange Roughy) and the Patagonia toothfish (Chilean sea bass).

You can see a Mola molas at a Nature Conservancy-supported marine protected area near Bali, Indonesia. The Mola mola congregate near Nusa Penida Island, and during the peak of mola season in October, there is a great chance of seeing the weirdness (and the parasites) of the Mola mola firsthand.

- See more at: http://blog.nature.org/science/2014/04/02/mola-mola-the-weirdest-fish-in-the-ocean/#sthash.J4zj7wCj.dpuf

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